art classrooms

Throughout the TALE project, I have been enthralled by art teachers’ classrooms. They are busy spaces, filled with pictures of student work, posters of art-related events and activities. There are piles of sketchbooks, jars with pencils, paintbrushes, sinks splattered with paint. There are large art books for students to reference. Often there is a kiln, sometimes a dark room too. There are trays for drying work on, or work is pegged up over the sink, like clothing on a washing line.

At Archbishop Tenison School in south London, Hannah King’s art class is similarly fascinating. The space is bright and airy. The art rooms are located right at the top of the school and so they make use of skylights, as well as a wall full of windows. The space is welcoming and busy, with posters on walls, a shelf full of reference books, and student artwork stacked deep against the walls.

The sense that the art spaces are somehow ‘different’ from the rest of the school though is not just something I have noticed. In my conversations with boys at ATS, they spoke of how being in the art space was different to being in other spaces in the school.

Is being in art similar or different to other lessons?

Completely different. Obviously the work is a lot different. But I think communication with the rest of my peers, it is also really nice to have because in this room it’s sort of like, I wouldn’t say family but it’s sort of that, the bond between all of us because we all have the same things we want to do. We all chose art for a reason. That just works perfectly in the workspace. Because of that bond that we have, I think that the space that we have is just… it’s just nice to be in the room with these people as well because they have the same interests as I do. It is friendly.

 You feel free because it’s just you sitting down, doing your work. No one is there to tell you what to do. It is just you, sitting there and expressing yourself, and sometimes we listen to music, which is helpful because you get new ideas.

The boys talked of how Hannah was different from other teachers too.

Miss is more free. She lets us do more creative stuff, like she lets us be in our zone. If you want to listen to music and get on and work, she’ll let us do that.

You have to be more creative. She lets you express yourself.

Moreover, approaches to work were different in art than they were in other lessons:

Art gives you a sense of freedom in this school. In our GCSE work in Year 11, we had 8 topics to choose from and I chose detail and with that you can just study three different artists and then create a final piece to do with your chosen theme and I think that is really good because the school doesn’t give us a fixed thing that we have to do. You can study different things, explore with arts, if it is sculpturing or if it is painting or if it is just tonal drawings. Ms King gives us the option to explore and try something new. You can mix two pieces of work together and it becomes your something good so I think it gives that sense of freedom so it also allows our creativity to just flow with the work.

The boys I spoke to at ATS put into words what I had only noticed – that being in an art classroom feels differently to other spaces at school. It was a space where they had freedom to express their ideas and thoughts, and spend time working creatively.

One thought on “art classrooms

  1. My research degree looked at how art teachers narrate their professional identities: one thing that came across very clearly was the awareness of the art room deliberately being a liminal space in the school, a place of shared endeavour rather than pedagogy from the front.

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