displaying and sharing art

This post is written by Lexi Earl, on her time at Welling School in Kent.

When I arrived at Welling School in Kent, I was immediately fascinated by the ‘mini gallery’ space in reception – a tall glass cube, filled with objects. It displayed work by Year 8 students, responding to work by American artist Judith Scott. These were vibrant, colourful balls that used thread and textiles to create new art from found objects. The wall next to this mini gallery was filled with posters advertising the school’s ‘alTURNERtive’ prize – a yearly art competition for students.

 

Welling is an art specialist school and there is a lot of opportunity to partake in art of various kinds, but what struck me in the first few moments was the clear importance of sharing and showing students’ work. In my few months on this project, I have noticed how students talk about sharing their work, and how comfort with sharing appears to develop over time – younger students tend to be more cautious about sharing their developing art works, whereas their older peers are sharing on social media and engaged in conversation with other young artists.

Students I spoke to clearly knew that their school valued the arts, their art in particular, and showcased this in various ways.

Art has always been very big in the school. I just think that it is appreciated.

They have an awards ceremony as well. The alTURNERtive prize they do that every year cause we have a gallery downstairs. And we have a lot of stuff around the room, like everyone’s work is displayed. Like last year, everyone’s final pieces will be up on the walls.

It’s one of the main things that attracted me to the school [the way it values art]. I used to go to [another school] and they’re into art as well but I thought that this was even more into art cause its what I want to go into so it felt like this was the right decision to come here.

When I asked how the school’s value of the arts made them feel they said:

It makes us want to do more big stuff and show it off, cause we know we can.

I feel less restricted cause you can make big stuff in this school.

One student explained about her experience in The alTURNERtive Prize:

So they choose a couple of people from Year 11, 12 and 13, art that they’ve done and they put it in the gallery and it’s like a show. Everyone comes in to watch it. And they choose an overall winner. […] It’s fun. It’s a good experience. You feel quite involved in everything and it feels a bit more real. And you feel like you get rewarded for the stuff you do, so it’s quite nice.

And what did everyone say when they came in and saw all the artwork?

It’s like not a community but like everyone’s joined together and everyone is like ‘oh, your work’s nice’, ‘and your work’s nice’ and you all give each other ideas. It’s a nice thing to do. It’s a good idea. It works.

Sharing art work at Welling was not only confined to formal gallery spaces or competitions. The teacher’s classrooms displayed student work, and the corridors of the art block were full of posters, art, photographs and notice boards showcasing recent plays or information on exhibitions students could visit.


At Welling I began to think about the role the school and teachers can play in creating spaces where students can share work in a gradual fashion – anonymously in the glass cube, with friends, family and other artists in the school gallery space, and eventually, on social media and in other public spaces. And through doing so, empower students to share their work with the world.

opportunity and art

This post is written by Lexi Earl about her recent visit to Archbishop Tenison School in London.

On our recent visit to Archbishop Tenison, Becky and I had a conversation with the Y13 art students. It was clear that they were taking advantage of the various opportunities they had been offered that connected them to art organisations and experiences outside of school – some were involved in Tate Collective, others in the October Gallery Youth Collective, and some had done work experience at Universal Studios. They supported each other’s efforts by attending events and going to exhibitions together, forming and creating their own art community.

october-gallery

By contrast, the Y10s were not yet involved in the arts community around them. In conversation I asked them whether they visited museums or galleries, either by themselves or with their families. They said no. They went on to say that it was likely that the only way they would visit such places would be on a school trip. This was interesting because ATS is a school in central London. The Tate is within walking distance. But these young people do not necessarily feel that they can access such places on their own.

Opportunities to become part of the art community, to participate in it, and to take up work experience do not happen by osmosis. The engagement of the Y13s in comparison to the Y10s is part of the work of Hannah King, their art teacher, and is an example of the role teachers play in connecting their students to wider opportunities and experiences within the arts and cultural organisations, either on their doorstep or more broadly in their communities.

Hannah explained the process through which she connects the students to opportunities they might not otherwise be able to access. She runs through her own personal contacts – friends and acquaintances working in a variety of industries that might be of interest to her students. She checks what opportunities might be possible with the organisations and businesses where she has contacts, looking at what is doable and realistic. She takes these opportunities to the Head of Sixth Form, to check whether the school can support the students to take advantage of an opportunity. Finally, she offers the various opportunities to the sixth form students – not only the art students, but anyone who might be interested. For example, students who are interested in the business side of arts organisations can also take advantage of these opportunities.

tate-collective

Hannah knows her students interests and future ideas, and is therefore able to tailor opportunities for them that will help them in the long run. As Hannah told us, it is not just the opportunity to gain work experience somewhere like Universal Studios, Apple, or Ministry of Sound. Having to put together a CV, and write a cover letter gives students practical life skills. This then supports their potential UCAS letters, and ultimately helps students once they start “thinking about how you apply for jobs”.

Teachers like Hannah King play an incredibly important role in connecting young people to the arts, widening the opportunities they may have, and exposing them to new ideas and people that they might otherwise miss.

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where’s that going to get you?

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unspecifiedF62B22SWIn many of the schools we have visited, students complain about the ‘where’s that going to get you?’ question. This question refers to their choice of art, drama, music, dance or photography as a GCSE subject. If we follow the question’s rather literal logic we might expect all students who have taken History to become Historians. Putting our collective understanding of the global employment context (or lack of it) aside for the time being, the ‘where’s that going to get you?’ question seems to have had an unexpected impact on young people. The 24 young people we meet in each of the thirty schools we are visiting, seem pretty clear about the value of the arts to their lives and refer to their own developing self expression, independent working, ability to take risks, collaborate and time manage. They also talk about personal growth and learning to empathise with the views of others in order to see the world from different perspectives. Whilst there is clarity and consensus about the value of art education, the students’ do not always have a similar breadth of knowledge and experience of the types of careers available to them as a result.

At Childwall School the range of partnerships with artists, creative and cultural institutions, such as the Tate, and universities directly addresses this issue. Students show an awareness of a wide range of future career possibilities and an awareness of the need to participate in creative communities in order to make important connections with art and artists in their city.

This ethos seems to emerge from the school, whose large scale public art and extensive murals create a sense of belonging as well access to art in the school itself. As Head of Art Chris Tyrer states:

We’re trying to get our pupils to buy into the idea of creating something and yet, if we are just telling them how to do it it’s completely different to them seeing something that is going to inspire them. For me if they are not inspired and they don’t see things in a real space then we are doing our pupils a disservice.

An appreciation of the wider ‘scene’ of arts practitioners in Liverpool has clearly made an impression on one student Alex Owens who describes himself as a Designer Maker and is a current student of Design at Liverpool Hope University. Alex works as an art technician at Childwall on a voluntary basis – he loves the place and is totally committed to it. I asked him why:

We once came up with the idea that it is a sense of belonging. That we should be here.

Alex also has a shared space at Bridewell studios which he says is great for students because it is so cheap. He describes how his teachers encouraged him to seek out interesting places to develop his ideas, as well as allowing him to retake exams and supporting him with university applications. Although he isn’t from an arty family he was often in a welder’s workshop with his Dad and is now already establishing himself as an artist. Alex finds Childwall an inspiring place to work and is unafraid of trying new approaches and materials:

I see new ways of making something every day. For example, digitally making via 3D rendering software and printing some ink via computer on to a T-shirt or piece of material.

To find out more about Alex’s work contact him on: alexowens13@icloud.com

The assumption in the question ‘where’s that going to get you?’ is that young people who do arts have little chance of ‘becoming an artist.’The impact of creating school spaces where young people work as artists and alongside artists therefore reflects and refracts this question in some thought-provoking ways.